Posted by: David D. Daggett | November 7, 2011

Stewardship

Stewardship

         Character is revealed by our actions. We become how we continually act. Perhaps this is one of the greatest lesson of stewardship. We are called to be good stewards in the community, at work, spiritually, for our planet, and even athletically. Along the way, stewardship makes us better in the process.

A Good Steward

        Long time friend Joe Loshiavo is Aid Station Director for the Ironman World Championship.

          Service is a cornerstone of stewardship. In his book How to Win Friends and Influence People Dale Carnegie points out that it is impossible to be depressed if we are helping other people. Most recently, in the latest edition of Consumer Reports there is an article that documents improved health and longevity through serving others.

         This time of year is stewardship season at churches and religious organizations. The first thought that comes to mind when discussing stewardship is money. Money is certainly necessary, and important, but money is just a piece of the stewardship puzzle.

         The practical reality is that stewardship is a multi-dimensional concept to which we each and all bring our gifts, talents, and service. Stewardship includes money, volunteering, service, leadership, encouragement and support, and even our daily little kind acts. Each of us sees stewardship from our own perspective. It is when those individual pieces fitting together with prudence and purpose that makes the stewardship puzzle successful.

         Stewardship demands that we are prudent and diligent with our time and resources. We have all seen organizations that are financially stable, but lack vibrancy, life, and therefore fall short of all the good they can do. Conversely, we have all seen organizations with good people and good hearts that fail to succeed due to lack of finances or organizational prudence. Perhaps this is why stewardship becomes such a difficult topic to discuss. It takes a multidirectional approach usually with organization leadership that can put the pieces together, while we each do our part.

         Perhaps the best description of stewardship that I have heard is by our senior pastor, the Reverend Dr. Green who describes stewardship as what we are doing today to preserve and pass on what is important to future generations. Perhaps this is a daily call we should heed in all important aspects of our lives. Along the way our character is revealed by what we individually and collectively become.

Working to be a good steward,

David

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: